SharpMap 1.0 RC1 Released

Over on Google+, Diego Guidi let me know that the SharpMap 1.0 Release Candidate has been released. There was a time when I worked with, and wrote about, SharpMap a lot. During that entire time, the stable version of SharpMap sat at some version number that started with “0.9”. The release of a 1.0 candidate is a signal that the project is moving forward.

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Early Bird Registration for FOSS4G-NA Closes Soon

David Bitner sent out a reminder that Early Bird reagistration for the FOSS4G North Americaconference closes on 1 April 2013. After that, the price goes up by $50 US. You can register online at EventBrite.

The preliminary program (PDF) for this year’s event looks exceptional, building upon and potentially exceeding the outstanding quality of FOSS4G-NA 2012. I’ll be sorry to miss the conference this year but will be looking forward to its social media exhaust.

Image by s shepherd schizoform on flickr CC-BY-2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

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Light Housekeeping

Just a quick note to tidy up some loose ends related to recent posts…

First, regarding the post ”A #LazyWeb Compendium of Python Resources for Beginners,” the University of South Florida PyBulls Python interest group, as promised, compiled a list of Python resources and posted it on their GitHub page. Thanks to them for their quick response.

Second, following up on the post ”The Best Thing I Saw at TUGIS 2013,” the data and workbooks for Dr. Arthur Lembo’s introduction to open-source GIS have been made available. The data can be found on GitHub and the workbooks can be found on the Eastern Shore Regional GIS Cooperative web site. Many thanks for contributing these resources.

These items are embedded in the comments for their respective posts but I thought it would be useful to call them out more prominently.

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The Best Thing I Saw at TUGIS 2013

I spent the day yesterday at Towson University attending the TUGIS 2013 conference. The new one-day format was a firehose that showcased the diversity of geospatial work occurring across the State of Maryland. The keynote by Learon Dalby was well-received and the content of the conference was generally substantive. While the day was a sprint, there was one workshop that really caught my attention more so than I would have thought from its title.

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Off to TUGIS

Tomorrow, I’ll be heading up to the Towson University GIS (TUGIS) conference with 500 or so of my closest Maryland geo-friends. It has been restructured into a one-day event and the program seems to be very content-rich as a result. I am particularly happy to see more open-source content this year. There’s an intro session featuring PostgreSQL, PostGIS, QGIS, and GeoServerpresented by Salisbury State University. Salisbury was once known as a bastion of Manifold so they’ve got a long history of thinking outside the Arc. Additionally, there is a session (by Towson University) discussing the use of GDAL, OGR, and Shapely in the development of a spatial service.

Brian Timoney's favorite state flag

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A #LazyWeb Compendium of Python Resources for Beginners

A friend who is in the midst of a career change and moving into the GIS world asked me for some pointers to resources for getting started with Python. I threw the question out to Twitter (with a similar variation also posted to Google+):

I got a couple of requests to summarize any information I received, which seemed reasonable. I got quite a few responses and here are some links:

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Arc2Earth: Choose Your ‘Cloud’

For various reasons, I can’t attend today’s inaugural FedGeoDay at the Woolly Mammoth Theatre in Washington, DC, though I’ll be watching the hashtag with great interest. Jack Flood of Arc2Earth, however, has already posted his slides to SlideShare:

 

While neither ArcMap nor Arc2Earth are open-source themselves, Jack points out that Arc2Earth acts as a bridge between ArcMap and several geospatial hosting platforms that are built on open-source technology but, also just as important, are successful at making data more openly available. These platforms include CartoDB and MapBox, among many others.

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